Raven

The Raven Boys by Maggie StiefvaterThe Raven Boys
by Maggie Stiefvater

Blue’s mother is a psychic. All of Blue’s aunts are psychics. All of the other women who live in her too-full, high-energy, gleefully crowded house are psychic. Blue is not, but she makes their energies stronger, just by being in the room.

Gansey is looking for old secrets. He has a knack for finding them. He has three friends who he’s roped into the search, who are more like brothers for all the ways they fight and curse and rush to help. And his search is about to gain velocity when he meets the psychic’s daughter…

Going into this novel, I had high hopes. I had just read Maggie Stiefvater’s The Scorpio Races and fallen in love with her writing style and the incredible sense of place she depicted. The Raven Boys was different, in that it focused more on character and a system of magic that didn’t so much fit perfectly into the world as transform the world, but I enjoyed it almost as much. I think that the fact that it is the first book in a series of four, and that I get to spend more time with these characters on this quest, evens the score. I really enjoyed this book.

I was in love with two of the five main characters within the first twenty pages. I was in love with all of them – invested in their goals, sympathetic to their hurts, hopeful for their futures – by the last page. As far as I’m concerned, that feeling of kinship and camaraderie, is the richest part of fiction.

Some difficult subjects come up in the course of the story, including suicide and abuse. While I would never recommend the book to someone without mentioning their inclusion because of the vivid nature of Stiefvater’s descriptions, I also think that they are boldly and hopefully handled.

I have already swung by the local library to pick up the sequel. After telling myself that I would space out the series, so that I didn’t finish them too quickly.

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2 thoughts on “Raven

  1. Pingback: Book Review: Maybe Too Much in Too Little of The Raven Boys | Nine Pages

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