Wednesday Serial: Farther Part CXII

Anie fire_handANIE

The birds started singing in the trees about the time that Anie had to start watching her feet while she walked. She lost her energy in the space of a yawn, and the growing light spreading through the sky on her right seemed wrong. She blinked heavily. Thea slowed, holding steadier, as Anie started to stumble. The others all pulled in a little closer, as if they might lean against each other.

The sun climbed heedlessly into the sky.

“When do we sleep?” Anie murmured.

“It’s not safe yet,” Chas said. But he was slowing too. The whole crowd ahead of them seemed to be stuttering in their steps. The trees were thinning, the ground evening out, but their feet seemed more and more hesitant to leave the ground.

And then, suddenly, that stutter turned into a halt. A whisper raced through the crowd, a hush like a gasp.

Then, someone screamed. One thin voice, and Anie brought her head up like it had been pulled on a string. She tightened her fingers in Thea’s hand. Others were shouting, and the sudden urgency crawled under her skin until she could feel her heart tapping against her ribs. She braced her feet, knees, legs, ready to sprint away again.

A thunder pounded into the ground after a moment, like a storm, sped up until it was unnatural. Ahead, the trees only dotted the roll of the hills, huddled together in twos and threes, and the rare, large bundles. It had been so long since Anie looked up, she was surprised. Beyond the thin trunks, it was hazy. A line of dust and dark shadows behind. Horses.

Darien held Mel steady. The woman who had caught Chas held out her hands, wide, to tell the others to hold. Few listened. The crowd tumbled back, and Anie pressed herself against Thea’s side to keep from getting separated from her. Mel appeared against her other side, and held her tight.

“Down!” the shout came through the commotion. “Every one down!” Anie searched the crowd, until she saw the man calling out, down on his knees in the dirt, catching the hands of the people around him to drag them down too. She dropped to her knees and tugged Thea down too, while the horses came close enough for them to hear the riders’ armor clanking.

One by one, the whole crowd came down, onto their knees, hands and knees, looking up with wide eyes, or heads down with hands over them. And Anie breathed deep, waiting for the thunder to stop.

The horses slowed. Whinnied and waffled around war gear. Tramped and wheeled, and riders relayed orders down the line.

At the front of the line, a woman sat a sleek, red horse. Her blonde hair was braided over one shoulder like another piece of her armor. Her knees were tucked behind metal plates. Her shoulders were squared, and the leather on the pommel of her sword had been worn smooth.

When she pulled her horse to a stop, she looked over the whole mass of them. Listened to someone behind her carefully. Then raised her voice. “If you’re armed, lay it down now!”

No one moved. There was nothing to lay down.

Anie steadied herself against Thea and watched the woman’s face.

“What are you doing here?” the woman demanded.

“We’re looking for Lord Tiernan,” the woman who stopped Chas said. “For safety!”

The woman on the horse paused, looking her over. She cocked her head back, listening to another rider who had just come in from the far end of the line. They exchanged a few words, quietly, and the red horse shuffled in the dirt.

“You all came from Madden’s fortress, at the mountain?” she called.

“From the encampments they built south of it,” a man replied. The same man who had told them to get on their knees. Beside Anie, Thea took a deep breath.

“How?” the woman on the horse demanded. “We fought for those encampments two days ago. They couldn’t be breached.”

The woman who had stopped Chas shrugged, not quite at a real loss. “Seryn Two-Hand decided to burn them down.”

The rider’s eyes narrowed. She exchanged one more short sentence with the men behind her. “My name is Deorsa. You will stay here, until I say so. Anyone who approaches the camp will be stopped, I promise you.”

Mel reached a hand around Anie’s shoulders, reached for Thea carefully. And slowly, she slipped off her knees and sat in the dirt. Mel wrapped her other arm around her knees and breathed deep. When she smiled at Anie, Anie just shook her head.

She twisted around to get more comfortable too, and rested her head against Thea’s arm. She should have closed her eyes and slept, but she watched the soldiers on the horses instead, while the crowd settled and resettled around her. As the dust cleared, Anie could look through the horses’ legs, and count the white tents spread behind them in their little rows.

It wasn’t long before two more riders came thundering up from the camp. One of them was broad, leather glistening richly in the sunlight. The other was lean tall and lean. Both shoulders on his jacket looked rough, like someone had ripped at them.

For the second time, Anie looked up sharply. It was Aled. She called for him before she realized she probably shouldn’t and Thea quickly cradled her head back against her. Deorsa had heard her, and was looking sharply in their direction. When Aled and the other man arrived beside her, she murmured something to him. Aled looked toward Anie immediately. Then he slid off his horse and came straight toward her.

Thea, Darien and Mel all looked at him warily as he crouched in front of Anie, but he was smiling as easily as ever.

“Anie,” he said happily. “Did you sprout wings? How did you get here?”

She almost grinned, because she was tired, and because he was hard not to grin at. “No,” she said. “Seryn came for us. She took us out through a window and we all climbed over the wall.”

His face twisted, just a little. Blinking, he cocked his head to one side. “Did she come with you?”

Anie shook her head.

Aled pulled back without standing, lifted his chin just enough to take a long look at the crowd over the girls’ heads. Behind him, the broad man was swinging down from his horse, and Doersa was handing her reins off to the man beside her. Aled twisted enough to see them both start toward him and looked back, his smile was a little dimmer. His eyes flicked to Thea’s hands wrapped around Anie, and then to Mel and Darien’s faces while they held his eyes fiercely.

“Who did come?” he asked. “Reese? Emyr?”

Anie shook her head again.

“We haven’t seen any of your guard,” Mel said. “Seryn came alone, and told us to get out of the camp, because she was going to burn it down.”

“What else did she tell you?” Aled asked.

“That she could bring Anie to us, if we would wait,” Thea said. She glanced up at the broad man as he came to a gentle stop near them. She looked at his face, then continued carefully. “That Lord Tiernan was close enough that we could catch up to him and we’d be safe with him.”

The man took a moment, and gave her a small nod.

“Why would she do that, Anie?” Aled asked. He held her eye and leaned in a little closer, until it seemed he had forgotten about the others. “Which of the others did she talk to?”

“Just me,” Anie said. She pulled back against Thea’s shoulder.

“And what did she tell you to do?” Aled asked.

“Climb out the window with her,” Anie said. “She said it would be the last hard thing she asked any of us to do.”

Aled blinked again, and for a moment Anie thought he was staring.

“There’s some trick here,” Deorsa murmured. She was taller than Anie had imagined, and she had to lean back to see her face, brow bent in, mouth a sharp question.

Aled looked at her out of the corner of his eye, then back to Anie. He gave her a wry, tilted smile.

“We’ll search them,” the broad man assured her quietly.

“Does it make sense to you?” Deorsa asked him.

The man considered the breadth of the crowd, and gave a small shake of his head. “Why would she just let these people go?”

It took Aled a moment to realize the question was aimed at him and he twisted to look up at them. Standing, he shoved his hands into his pockets. “She wouldn’t. Macsen owns her.” Then he shrugged. “So, either Macsen is pulling the trick. Or Seryn lost her mind.”

“What do you think we should do with them?” the man asked, in the same measured, even tone.

Aled shrugged. “What you planned to do with them, I suppose.”

“Just take them back to Oruasta?” Deorsa said. She shook her head at him. There was a small smile at the corner of her mouth. “Did Seryn send you?”

Aled just shook his head, returning the tight smile.

The broad man nodded down at the girls before he turned and took long, steady strides back to his horse. Deorsa and Aled followed wordlessly behind him, mounted up and followed him a little ways off.

“I think that was Lord Tiernan,” Thea whispered against Anie’s hair.

The soldiers left their horses in a line, a wall of mounts barring them from the camp, and slowly became combing through them. They asked each person for their name, where they came from, what family they brought with them. What family they had left behind, and scribes followed behind the soldier marking answers with short charcoal scratches. Anie tried to stay awake, but after the first hour, she shut her eyes.

She slept until Mel shook her awake. Thea was asleep too, and Mel woke her next. Their shadows were outrageously long, and the sun was barely showing over the edge of the mountains.

“They’re taking us to the camp,” Mel said. “They can’t find anything wrong with us.

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Friday Serial: Farther Part CX

Anie fire_handANIE

 The encampments were on fire, Thea told Anie. Before long, Anie could smell the smoke, rich as a hearth fire and sharper in the wide night air. There was something else in it, something choked and choking, and Anie breathed in deep trying to decide what it was. Sharp. Acidic. When she started coughing, she stopped, and pulled her shirt up over her mouth.

The smoke stayed with them longer than Anie thought it would have. Thea slowed to a walk and called for the others to stay close. Chas caught Nessim by the shirt, forcing him to walk as well. Darien swung wide, disappeared and appeared again at the front of their little pack. His short strides forced them all together, and Anie glanced around at the haze that brightened and obscured the dark.

They walked for hours. Anie’s eyes stung. She blinked them shut over and over.

Then, finally, the air cleared. The trees gleamed under the starlight, and the breeze cut deeper between them. Anie pulled her shirt closer around her, and shuddered a little.

Vetlynn pressed in close to her shoulder.

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Wednesday Serial: Farther Part XCIII

Anie fire_handANIE

“Something’s happening,” Nessim said. Suspicious, he twisted in his seat across from Anie, looking over his shoulder at Aled and Drystan. His breakfast plate was empty in front of him, but he was waiting for Sevi like always, and had nothing better to do than watch the soldiers in their comings and going.

Anie chewed through her next bite and watched too. Aled was giving an order. There was nothing strange about that, but it was interesting how Drystan’s eyes had widened just a little as he heard it.

“What do you think it is?” Anie murmured, quieter than Nessim.

“You think it’s about us?” Vetlynn asked.

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Wednesday Serial: Farther Part LXXXII

Anie fire_handANIE

Da called up the stairs. His voice was a little muffled coming up through the wooden floor beside Anie’s bed. Her room seemed a little large. Thea was sleeping in a dozen beds at once. But it was good to hear his voice.

Anie shifted onto her side, reburying her head in the pillow. She was going to steal her few more minutes of sleep. Da would understand. She thought he was probably proud of her too, now that she wasn’t really running away after all. They hadn’t gone so far from the city.

Her thoughts seemed to stutter against each other, matching what she knew had happened to the room around her. She realized her eyes were shut. She realized she was dreaming. The floor should not be standing upright and there were too many Thea’s in the room. Da’s voice was too high, too much like Drystan’s.

“Come on, come on, come on!” Drystan called, a sing-song too bright for the early morning. “Roll out of bed. Put your feet on the floor. Walk yourselves to breakfast. If you’re still dreaming, I suppose you can swim there, but move, move, move!”

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Wednesday Serial: Farther Part LXXVI

Anie fire_handANIE

It took Anie longer than she thought it would. Running with the others, she knew it took a while to work all the way around the top of the well. By herself, it suddenly felt too wide, and each time her foot hit the planks beneath her, they seemed to swallow seconds. Her stride was too slow, and the wall went on and on. She was breathing hard when she stopped – too hard, it seemed – and she had to remind herself that she had been tired before she took that last round.

As she came around the back of the fort, she had seen Rhian beckoning the others over with the staves. They formed up their circle without her while she ran. Now, the fort echoed with the slap of wood on wood. The kids kept perfect time with each other, with Rhian shouting over them. Chas and a dozen others struck a counter point from the far wall, while Aled gave instructions and there were other circles beyond them, too many of Ern’s folk to fit into one practice group. Each of them clattered through their calls. Seryn’s friends, stripped out of their uniforms, moved in the combat ring by the main hall, just one pair at a time, and Anie thought their noise would have been lost under the rest, but it cracked the loudest in the open air.

Anie leaned over her knees, listening while she tried to catch her breath. Knowing she should straighten up to let air in, but not really caring, she squinted at Rhian as the older girl waved her over. Denna was on her shoulders, and she could move her arm very high, but Denna waved too, excited. Anie dragged herself upright.

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Wednesday Serial: Farther Part LXXV

Anie fire_handANIE

Anie passed Chas most mornings. One of them was always coming in for breakfast when the other was leaving, and he ran around the walls just like the rest of them. He and a whole company followed Ern through the laps, with Wynn or Leolin or Gan calling instructions for them the same why Rhian called them for Anie and the others. She heard him talking with whoever stood next to him, always just a little loud, as if he was helping her keep track of where he was. They nodded at each other when they walked by the other, or just met the other’s eye across the yard. Occasionally, they were close enough to trade a few words. He always smiled at her. She always reached out and squeezed his hand.

She looked for him in the afternoons, but he was never there. She meant, always, to ask him where he could find to disappear, but never did.

She just passed him, coming and going.

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Wednesday Serial: Farther LXXIV

Anie fire_handANIE

Anie had never been so sore.

The first few weeks that Mel had worked with Da in the smith, she had complained about muscle ache, with all the bright energy that she did all of her talking. Anie almost didn’t believe her, for the first few days, but then Mel’s feet scuffed the floor more often than they should, and when she sat down, it took a lot more than her usual whims to drag her out of the comfort of a seat. It was the only time that Anie could remember knowing that she could walk out of a room, come back, and still find Mel just as she left her. Mel stayed up later than usual those two weeks, as late as Momma and Da would allow, just to avoid climbing the stairs to her room.

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Flash Fiction: Wonder For a While (1265 words)

There was a bloody sword under the bed, kicked there as if a person’s instinct to hide it had only briefly overwhelmed their apathy for getting caught. The mis-matched blankets on the bed fell far enough over the sides to hide it, but the breeze from the window threaded the smell of it out into the open.

Dovev had walked into the room, and felt the wrongness of it before she had settled the door shut again. Inside three shallow breaths, she had found it and pulled it out. Then she sat back on her knees and stared at it, trying to understand who had put it in her room.

It was not her sort of weapon. It was too long, too hard to hide, impossible to slip up a sleeve. She had a knife she always carried with her, long and thin in its own right, but it had always fit in a sheath beneath her knee, and now that she was taller, it lay well between her wrist and elbow. She picked up others as she found them, and threw them away as she needed, but they were rarely bloody, and she would never let them grow a stink like this.

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Flash Fiction: Levity (448 words)

“We’re almost out of time,” Jerdan murmured, holding Danneel’s elbow under the bare cover of the doorway.

She leaned against the wooden frame, hand on the cool paneling, head on her hand, and listened close. She watched the rain come down hard. The heavy drops bounced against the dry ground right now, gathering in brown puddles on the surface. In a few minutes, the puddles would sink into the dirt easier than the driving rain, and turn everything to mud.

Mud held footprints too well. They were almost out of time, if they still wanted to run. She could almost make herself believe that it was a biting truth. She could almost breathe it in deep enough to start a panic in her blood. But a laugh came so much easier.

It had been a good long while since she had been out of time.

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Wednesday Serial: Farther Part LXIX

Anie fire_handANIE

They stood around for another moment, each of them looking at each other. Nessim rubbed his stomach, and glared at Rhian, as if she should have told him this before he’d eaten the breakfast he had. Or perhaps he just liked to glare at her. Sevi held Denna’s hand and glanced around at the others. Cidra and Anie looked at each other, nodded, and turned around to run.

Cidra’s long strides were almost too much for Anie to match, but she stretched, then sped up, and stayed close at the other girl’s heels. The others followed, feet pounding in mismatched rhythms behind her. They took the first corner, and then the second, the ground smooth and flat except for where the occasional wide stump poked its flat head up through the dirt. The running was easy, all the way back around to Rhian. It took them just over a quarter hour.

“I thought I told you to run,” Rhian joked, and she motioned for them to keep going.

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